Angelica Poversky

Angelica Poversky's picture
Photo credit: 
Pauline Vaucher
Biography: 
Angelica Poversky (they/them) is a queer non binary Jewish spoken word poet and community organizer.   
 
Angelica creates work around manifesting new cultures of nurturance in regards to gender and consent. In 2020, they released two debut audio spoken word collections dealing with queerness and forgiveness. One of their tracks, "Entropy of Forgiveness" was the winner of the Adobe Project 1324 Inspire Mental Wellness Award.
 
Angelica has shared stages with rabbis and clowns, performing and facilitating workshops across North America. Angelica has developed programs in partnership with The Museum of Anthropology, Cinevolution Media Arts, Jewish Queer Trans Vancouver, and Everybody Is In, working towards community cohesion through uses of art, poetry, language, and media.  
 
After being awarded a Creative City Spark grant, they have been mentoring a group of youth, "The Flaming Balloon Collective" to establish a poetry press celebrating healing justice through the expansion of language.
 
Angelica stays faithful to the joy of creating and witnessing poems.
Micro-interview: 
Did you read poetry when you were in high school? Is there a particular poem that you loved when you were a teenager?: 

I fell in love with poetry in a transformative way in high school. Joining the poetry club at my high school was pivotal; it introduced me to spoken word. The first spoken word poem I remember listening to was Shane Koyzcan's "To this Day" at poetry club.  I fell in love, I fell in love, and I fell in love again. After this poem, I kept digging and finding out about poets. I became (and still am) impasioned by folks like Shane Koyczan, Buddy Wakefield and Saul Williams. Later on the poetry club led me to the Vancouver Youth Poetry Slam scene as well as the the BC youth spoken word competition, Hullabaloo. At these events, I made deeply foundational relationships that continued to shape my relationship with spoken word. I teamed up with two of these folks, Andrew Warner and Emma Field, to form the Tiny Tricycle Poets - and we toured for three summers together performing poetry as soon as I was out of high school. Fast forward a little and the three of us opened for Shane Koyczan at the Vogue Theatre last summer. All this to say - you could end up sharing stages with your biggest influences in high school faster than you can imagine.

When did you first start writing poetry? And then when did you start thinking of yourself as a poet?: 

When I was five, I was excited by Arthur's theme song. The rhythm and the rhyming were thrilling. I stole some of the end rhymes from our favourite aardvark and boom. I became a poet for the first time. After that, I started writing little rhymes about kindergarden, baloons, and the colour blue. Then I became a poet again, when I shared a poem in grade one, and my friend told me - "wow, that's amazing that it rhymes and it makes sense!"

And now, I move into becoming a poet more and more every day - as I learn what that means, and how that evolves in its meaning.

What do you think a poet’s “job” is?: 

A poet's job is to unearth truth. Shatter walls. Release language. To dig up definitions. A poet's job is to surrender into desperation or triumph or pain, but always with awe and courage to face what is most scary. Poets are unsilencers. 

If you had to choose one poem to memorize from our anthology, which one would it be?: 

The Ringing Bell by Amber Dawn.

Publications: 
Poem title(s): 
Becoming; The 8 Divine Genders
Title: 
The Gaze Journal
Publisher: 
The Gaze Journal
Date: 
September 1 2020
Publication type: 
Periodical/Magazine
Poem title(s): 
Queer Consent
Title: 
Sad Magazine
Publisher: 
Sad Magazine
Editors: 
Marcus Prasad
Date: 
August 6 2020
Publication type: 
Periodical/Magazine
Poem title(s): 
Undone
Title: 
Pandemic Publications
Publisher: 
Pandemic Publications
Date: 
June 8 2020
Publication type: 
Periodical/Magazine